How to Save Money on Supplements

Written by | Posted under Nutrition | 5 years ago

The Supplements-Goals Reference GuideNowadays you can buy supplements for almost anything. That said, part of the reasons why I hate reviewing supplements (even though it makes me money) is because the majority of them aren’t worth a dime.

Most supplements nowadays are a mixture of known things that work and odd substances that have little or no proof of efficacy. Every “new” supplement is a remix of “known good substances” and obscure amounts of different unproven substances. Throw marketing into the mix and you pay at least 50% markup to pay for pictures of the poster boy on the supplement bottle.

The best way to save money on supplements is to buy supplements that work best towards your goal.

Because of my distaste of the supplements industry, I’m quite ecstatic to hear that the guys at Examine.com wrote up The Supplements-Goals Reference Guide.

The Guide

The Supplements-Goals Reference Guide is 800+ pages of quick lookup reference that will help you quickly answer the question: “What should I take if my goal is __________?”. For example, if I want to increase my fat oxidation, then BOOM, I want to take green tea catechins and caffeine. If I want to fix my depression, then BOOM, I want to take fish oil. Though there are other, those were the top most effective supplements for each goal. It took me less than a minute to lookup each of those.

No more will I waste time and money on supplements that don’t work. (I’m sure I wasn’t the only one that spent so much money on CLA supplements to burn fat – O well, you live and learn)

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It’s a steal at $29

Seriously, think of all the money, time, and confusion you’ll be saving from not having to do your own supplement research. Your health and wallet will thank you.

The Supplements-Goals Reference Guide

Check out the The Supplements-Goals Reference Guide (referral link)

About Examine.com

A bit of a background about Examine.com. Those guys are the most reputable authority on supplements. Examine.com is the wikipedia for supplements. Every supplement on that site has plenty of citations showing proof (or disproof) of efficacy. Not only that, the nice guys also grade how trust worthy each experiment is and also make it easy for us laymen to understand with nice charts & tables. For example, look at how awesome their Fish Oil page is (700+ citations WTF? BBQ’d?).

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